Saturday, February 25, 2017
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Does your brand definition allow you upsells and product growth while keeping you core focus on your ideal customers and their problems?

Have you ever thought that for something to be a unique selling proposition it needed to be really significant, like the Craftsman Hand Tools Lifetime, Unlimited Warranty or owning a patent or having a guarantee like FedEx’s guaranteed next day delivery? I used to. Then I began to pay attention and discovered that unique selling propositions (USPs) only have to be distinctive and important to the prospect.

To give you an example of a business person doing a good job of developing his USP, I’m going to continue my analysis of restaurateur Scott Slater and Slater’s 50/50. If your uniqueness appeals to your target market, then you may have a unique selling proposition. The goal is to have some distinction that sets you apart from others so that patrons have a reason to come. Almost any branding campaign can create a unique selling proposition just by heavy and constant repetition of their brand name and tagline. The problem with such an approach is that small and mid-sized businesses lack the advertising budget to build a brand just on the repeating an advertising slogan over and over on TV. Scott Slater, on the other hand, takes the path of most small businesses. Continue reading

Here’s a number to make any small manufacturer or small business take note: Clickbank has paid affiliates over $1,294,388,522 in the company’s ten years in business. I captured this figure Friday, June 26, 2009, 11:08 PM PDT. Marketing Sherpa reported in their Affiliate Summit 2006 Wrap-Up Report that commissions would reach $6.5 billion in 2006. Those figures demonstrate the huge impact this form of Internet marketing has.

This is a way to add a sales organization of commission-only salespeople! Affiliate marketing offers a solution that small manufacturers are looking for. How do you get sales help when your average sale is so small that you can’t attract an independent rep, and you’re too small to afford a sales team of your own? Turn to Internet marketing and specifically to affiliate marketing. Continue reading